Review – Low Red Moon by Ivy Devlin

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Today we hear from Bookbabbler Liz…

Low Red Moon – Ivy Devlin

The only thing Avery Hood can remember about the night her parents died is that she saw silver – deadly silver, moving inhumanly fast. As much as she wants to remember who killed her parents, she can’t, and there’s nothing left to do but try to piece her life back together. Then Avery meets the new boy in school – Ben, mysterious and beautiful, with whom she feels a connection like nothing she’s ever experienced before. When Ben reveals he’s a werewolf, Avery still trusts him – at first. Then she sees that sometimes his eyes flash an inhuman silver. And she learns that she’s not the only one who can’t remember the night her parents died. Part murder mystery, part grief narrative and part heart-stopping, headlong romance, Low Red Moon is a must-read for teen paranormal fans.

I was quite excited about reading Low Red Moon because I love anything supernatural, so I was surprised when it turned out to be better than I’d actually expected. Low Red Moon centres around Avery, a girl who is forced to move out her forest home and live with the grandmother she barely knows after her parents are murdered.

Avery was kind of a misfit; she didn’t really have any friends at school, and due to living in the forest for so long, she didn’t really see the world the way others did. Things got progressively worse after her parents were killed; she couldn’t remember how they died no matter how hard she tried, and she had to leave behind the only home she’d ever known. I think Avery dealt with the situation very well; despite her grief and loneliness, she just tried to get on with things, whilst simultaneously trying to figure out who killed her parents. She seemed to be a very strong person, and was not someone who cried easily or moaned and whined about her problems. She kept herself to herself and tried not to rely too much on others, and I liked this independence about her. I also loved her connection with the forest, which is something that made the novel different from anything else I’ve read. But of course, after meeting the mysterious new student, Ben, a lot of things changed for Avery. Avery and Ben connected immediately, and there was definite chemistry there which I enjoyed reading about. I liked Ben more than I thought I would: he was very sweet, and like Avery, he hadn’t had an easy life, his own family having been murdered by wolf-hunters. However, I found it a bit odd how they found themselves liking each other so much so quickly (the word “love” was being tossed around a bit too early for my liking), but I guess the supernatural element explained this a little. Still, I wish there was more time to develop the relationship a bit further so they could get to know each other a bit more.

One of the characters I really liked in Low Red Moon was Renee, Avery’s grandma. She seemed to really care for Avery even though they hadn’t spoken properly in years, and I always felt bad for her whenever Avery felt uncomfortable around her, or acted very distant. She was also very smart, and determined to keep Avery safe. However, there was something strange about her, as though she was hiding something, and though I did actually guess what this rather predictable “secret” was from almost the very beginning, later twists in the book made up for it, and there was a lot of stuff that happened that I did not expect at all. In fact, the last few pages were really well-paced and full of suspense.

A character we didn’t really see much of, but who I also liked, was Kirsta, Avery’s friend. I got the feeling there was more to her than we first would have thought, especially after she admitted she hadn’t been much of a friend lately. I felt that maybe she wasn’t just some shallow girl after attention, but there was something else we hadn’t discovered. We never really got to find out much more about her, but I still think she was an interesting character.

Another thing to say about Low Red Moon is how beautiful the book itself is. There’s a gorgeous red double page after the front cover with an image of a haunting looking forest and a red moon, and each chapter is headed with a red tree, with some smaller red trees printed at the bottom of each page. I really liked these little details and thought they added a lot the reading experience and made it more enjoyable.

In conclusion, Low Red Moon was an excellent supernatural read, with certain unexpected elements to make it even more interesting. I think the author has created a fascinating world and I’d recommend this to supernatural fans who like mystery and romance as well.

Thanks, Liz and thanks to Bloomsbury for sending us a copy.

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